Noah's Stop 11 Animal Hospital

(317)885-PAWS

NoahsStop11

Noah's Stop 11 Animal Hospital
4625 E. Stop 11 Road
Indianapolis, IN 46237
(317)885-PAWS
{(317)885-7297}

FAX: (317)881-3177

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   EMERGENCY SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR PET OWNERS
It seems that disaster hits somewhere everyday: a house fire, tornado, flood, chemical spill, and terrorist attack, almost without end. While our pets avoid the stress of worrying about these disasters, at the same time, they are less able to deal with the reality of a disaster. How well they are able to survive an actual disaster will depending in large part upon how we have planned ahead should something happen close to home.
 

The following guidelines are meant to help you have your pets ready to handle these types of emergencies.

1) Before an Emergency:

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Be sure your pet’s vaccinations are current

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Take several pictures of all the animals in your household. Include any distinguishing marks. Store in a resalable plastic bag and keep with your other important papers. Include a copy of their vaccination and medication dosing instructions.

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Buy a pet carrier or crate for each pet. It should be large enough for the pet to stand and turn around in comfortably. ALLOW YOUR PETS TO BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE CARRIER IN A NON-THREATENING WAY.

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Keep at least a three day supply of pet food, water and treats on hand. Store dry food in air and water tight containers. Stock up on extra cat litter.

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Keep a properly fitted collar with tags on each pet (including cats that never go outside). These should include current license, rabies, and I.D. tags (with your name, pet’s name, address and phone number). Consider a microchip implant I.D. (A properly fitted collar should be just tight enough to slip two fingers easily between the collar and neck, without being able to slide the collar over the head. For cats and some outdoor dogs it is important to select a collar with a breakaway feature or elastic section in the collar. “Choker chains” are not a substitute for a regular collar and should only be used for walking animals, then removed with the leash).

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Start a “buddy system” in your neighbor hood to check on pets when you are not at home. Exchange veterinary information and file a permission slip with your veterinarian authorizing your “buddy” to get necessary emergency treatment for your pet if you cannot be located. Place a pet alert sticker on you r front and back doors alerting the fire department to presence of pets.

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Find out in advance where you may take your pets during a major disaster (fire/tornado), if you house is threatened or destroyed. This may be a boarding facility, veterinary clinic, friend or relative’s house. Also find out which hotels outside you home area accept pets in an emergency. Red Cross shelters DO NOT allow pets, but they work with the Emergency Management Office and may know of a facility.

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In case you should have to evacuate and can not take your pets, survey and decide the best locations for your pets inside your house. Stay away from windows. Consider easy to clean areas (such as bathrooms, kitchens, utility rooms). If you have both dogs and cats, you must have two areas, even if the animals usually get along well. In case of flooding, try to avoid basement.2) During an emergency:

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If time permits, bring your pets inside immediately.

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If you evacuate and leave your pet(s) behind, bring indoors. Prepare the pre-selected site in the house, leave only dry foods. Leave food and fresh water in large sturdy containers that the pet cannot overturn. If possible, open a faucet slightly to let water drip into a big container. If using bathroom, partially fill bathtub (1 to 4 inches only). DO NOT leave vitamin or mineral treats, overeating these can cause poisoning.

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Take your pet’s vaccination and medical records with you (and photographs).

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If you evacuate your home and plan to take your pet elsewhere, take all items acquired before the emergency – food, non-spill containers, medications, vaccination/medical records, play toys, kennels, etc.3) After the Emergency:

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If, after the disaster, you have to leave town, take your pet(s) with you, pets will not survive on their own.

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The first few days after the disaster, leash your pets to maintain close contact. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and your pet could become confused and lost even in “familiar” surroundings. Power lines may be down, snakes, raccoons, skunks, and other wild animals may also be driven into the area seeking shelter and/or food.

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If your pet is lost during the disaster, contact boarding kennels, animal control facilities, humane societies, and local veterinary hospitals (it is best to actually visit these facilities, as the staff may be too overwhelmed to have an accurate description of every pet).]

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If you find someone else’s lost pet, contact the local humane society, animal control department, or numbers that may be set up during the disaster to report lost and found animals.

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The behavior of your pet(s) may change after an emergency. Normally quiet and friendly cats and dogs may become aggressive or defensive. Monitor them closely.

ADDITIONAL GUIDELINES FOR OWNERS OF EXOTIC PETS:

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Birds must eat daily to survive. You may have to leave your birds behind in a disaster. Before the disaster, contact your local pet store about food dispensers, which can regulate the food amounts over time.

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Birds should be CAGED; parrots and related birds should be caged INDIVIDUALLY. Cover the cage with a thin cloth or sheet to give security and to filter light.

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Each bird should have its own food and water dispensers

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Keep cages away from windows and mirrors. Make sure cages are on secure surfaces and will not slide or fall.

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Keep cages several feet off of the floor.

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Keep birds, reptiles, and small mammals (hamsters, gerbils, etc.) secure and away from dogs and cats.

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Keep transport cages available for all pets, such as small shoe-box cages (small plastic cages with ventilated lids available at most pet stores) for small mammals, smaller bird cages for birds, and for reptiles, a few small ice chests are ideal (several small snakes or lizards may fit into a single chest – each sealed in an individual cotton pillow case – not more than two deep, smallest on top). These cages are also handy for safe, routine transport into your veterinarian’s office.